What is PrEP, exactly?

We tried something new last weekend: a celebration at the end of our fiscal year that focuses on what we have achieved as an organization and as an opportunity to share our mission with those who may be vaguely aware of TTAC, but have never had the opportunity to ask questions.

We had many great one-on-one conversations that were quite interesting, and there was significant focus and discussion of HIV/AIDS.

One event attendee asked, “What is PrEP?”  Our team members did our best to answer the question, but we decided to do a blog post to explore the topic further.

What is PrEP?

According to the CDC, “PrEP” stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. The word “prophylaxis” means to prevent or control the spread of an infection or disease. The goal of PrEP is to prevent HIV infection from taking hold if you are exposed to the virus. This is done by taking one pill every day. These are some of the same medicines used to keep the virus under control in people who are already living with HIV.

That’s a pretty straightforward answer. Note the bit about “taking one pill every day.” When we answered off the cuff, we said the opposite. That’s why we’re not in the business of providing services–but rather fundraising!

There’s a ton of great info on the CDC website on this topic, such as whether PrEP is a vaccine, how to get it, how to pay for it, who should consider taking it, and much more. Please explore that site for this info, in the interest of keeping this blog post short.

We loved the infographics on the site, such as this one:

prepthumb1

PDF version

For more information about HIV/AIDS testing, prevention, and treatment, we recommend getting in touch with Columbia/Boone County Public Health.

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